Tag Archives: Twitter

Analyzing Social Media – The Glass Ceiling

Does social media have a glass ceiling problem? Even as companies rush to exploit social media in every conceivable way, a report from The Conference Board and the Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University finds that senior executives don’t seem to take the results seriously – if they look at them at all.

glass ceiling

  • Fewer than 24% of companies report that senior management sees reports gleaned from social media metrics; and only 14% build it into their KPI’s
  • 20% say social media information is too low-level for senior management and 32% say it’s too low-level for board memebers

Ironically, senior executives are actually more likely than the population at large to use social media.

Does senior management receive social media metrics:

  • 23.6% – yes
  • 55.5% – no
  • 20.9% – huh?

 

Have we reached Saturation Leveling?

It’s no secret that there are more products and services using more platforms and outreach streams with the marketplace dangerously close to saturation with marketing messaging. But just because it’s different, doesn’t mean it’s differentiating. Brands will have to plan and research engaging pre-launch activities if they wish to level the playing field and earn a high engagement-to-effort return on their investments.

Have we reached brand saturation?

Have we reached brand saturation?

Brand Values Alignment

 

Hard to define, brand loyalty

Hard to define, brand loyaltyOne of the most powerful things a brand can do is align its values with its customer’s values. While brands can promise functional, emotional, experiential or self-expressive benefits, those whose values are aligned with their customers’ values are much more likely to achieve a deeper and longer lasting loyalty. This coupled with today’s competitive environment makes brand values alignment a priority of every brand marketer.

One of the most powerful things a brand can do is align its values with its customer’s values. While brands can promise functional, emotional, experiential or self-expressive benefits, those whose values are aligned with their customers’ values are much more likely to achieve a deeper and longer lasting loyalty. This coupled with today’s competitive environment makes brand values alignment a priority of every brand marketer.

Save the Ocean Contest Week #2

Week 2 for the Save the ocean contest:

Post entries on facebook at http://www.facebook.com/YourSanctuaryTV in the comments and on twitter – #YourSanctuaryTV – describing what they’ll pledge to do to “Save the Ocean!”

Whichever pledge receives the most likes and RT’s wins a delicious dinner for two at Café Fina in beautiful Monterey, California.

Saving the Ocean Can Be a Very Tasty Good Deed

English: Map of the Monterey Bay National Mari...

English: Map of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sanderlings search for food at the Monterey Ba...

Sanderlings search for food at the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Your Sanctuary

Rock wave break with birds, Monterey Cailfornia

Rock wave break with birds, Monterey Cailfornia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 AMP2, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary,

and Café Fina Collaborate on Contest Created

To Inspire People to “Make a Difference in Ocean Protection”. 

Weekly Dinner for Two Give-Away

Tied to Award Winning Ocean Conservation

Television Program That’s Looking for “Sea Stars”

AMP2, (Monterey County’s only Curated Community Television Channel), The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, and Monterey’s locally owned award winning restaurant, Café Fina, have teamed up on a Facebook contest that will have entrants licking their lips in anticipation.

“Saving the Ocean Even Tastes Good” is set to launch next week and it puts a new “taste” and face to Ocean Conservation efforts.

The contest works like this: Every week, contestants will post entries in – 100 characters or less – on the “Your Sanctuary” Facebook page describing what they’ll pledge to do to “Save the Ocean”.

Whichever pledge receives the most votes (votes can be tweeted or posted on the Your Sanctuary Facebook page) wins a delicious dinner for two at Café Fina.

At the end of 13 weeks, Judges from local media, the Sanctuary staff, and volunteers will pick the Grand Champion.

This lucky winner will be designated a “Certified Sea Star” and appear in a promotional spot for amp2’s award winning ocean conservation television program, “Your Sanctuary”, and a part on a future episode.

After a second 13-week contest, all 26 weekly winners will be entered into a contest to win the Grand Prize…a Sanctuary Dream Day including whale watching, a romantic dinner along the Sanctuary, and a night’s stay at a romantic hotel next to the Sanctuary. So saving the ocean can become not just tasty and meaningful, but lead to a very nice evening for two.

“This started when I realized how powerful a tool Social Media can be when used for a good cause,” remarked contest creator, and “Your Sanctuary” Producer, Steve Ellzey. “We’re thrilled to partner with amp on another project aimed at protecting our Ocean resources,” added the television show’s host, Paul Michel, who is the Superintendent of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

Café Fina is owned by Monterey native son, Dominic Mercurio, who also owns Domenico’s. Both restaurants are located on Fisherman’s Wharf. Mr. Mercurio was raised in Monterey and grew up enjoying authentic Italian dishes cooked with locally caught seafood. He is also part owner of an almond orchard where he also grows organic produce for use in his restaurants.

The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary stretches from Cambria to the mouth of the San Francisco Bay. Measuring over 7,000 square miles, the Sanctuary achieved its designation largely through a grass roots effort led by local chapters of nonprofit organizations including Save Our Shores and The Surfrider Foundation.

Media Relations Pitching Tips

Today‘s Today’s media pros are dealing with brutal deadlines and severe budgetary constraints, and they need PR‘s content and your storytelling skills. However, they don’t need to be inundated with spammy or off-the-mark pitches that aren’t relevant to their beat or their audience. At PR News’ One-day Bootcamp for Emerging PR Stars, held on Nov. 29 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., Nate Hindman, small business editor for the Huffington Post, provided 11 tips for PR pros to improve their pitching and relationships with the media.

  • Do not call journalists to pitch—ever: “We’re usually up against one of many deadlines, and these calls throw us off track,” said Hindman. “I’d strongly suggest to always e-mail pitches. Twitter also works for pitching, but Facebook is too personal.”
  • Use their name—don’t send pitches with “Dear Blogger” or “Dear Journalist”:  Journalists are narcissists—we didn’t get into this business to make money, we did it to see our name in a byline,” said Hindman. “If you send out blanketed pitches to journalists and don’t use their names, you’re doing yourself a disservice.”
  • Use flattery: Go to his or her media site’s archive page and find a story written by the targeted journalist who relates to your client. “Consider opening the e-mail with, ‘I loved your story on this, it changed my way of thinking on this issue…'” said Hindman. “Then say, ‘by the way, this is my client and I think this will…'”
  • Consider pitching journalists after hours and in the evening: “There’s a lot less incoming e-mail traffic and you likely won’t get them at peak work hours of writing,” said Hindman.
  • Do the work for them: Many journalists are hesitant to write about a specific company, but they will write about a trend. “Don’t just tell me the existence about your client, or that he’s in town. Tell me what they’re doing to unseat or kill off a corporate giant (especially in the small-business space). You can even attempt, in the e-mail, to write the story—give me what you think my lead should be,” said Hindman.
  • Keep it short: Never have a pitch be longer than two paragraphs. “I rarely ever read anything longer than that,” said Hindman.
  • Tell the journalist who you are: Unless your company or client is really well known, don’t assume that journalists know them, said Hindman. “Remember, you’re trying to craft a headline and draw them in as a reader of the e-mail, just as reporters do with their stories,” he said.
  • Following up is okay: “You can follow up once, but don’t follow up 30 times on an e-mail,” said Hindman.
  • Develop real relationships first: It’s great to be able to keep up with people through social media, but hard to start a real relationship. “The best relationships I’ve had with PR pros have been developed face to face. Any chance you have to get a beer or a coffee with a journalist is very valuable,” said Hindman.
  • Don’t promise what you can’t deliver: “Don’t make empty promises and say you can get us something when you can’t,” said Hindman. “Don’t promise statements from sources or supporting data that you’re not going to get.”
  • Follow up and share: Tell a journalist how good you thought their piece was and that you’ll be sharing it on your own social networks. “This makes them feel honored and important, and makes them more likely to work with you in the future,” said Hindman.