Tag Archives: Carmel Wine Walk

Carmel Road Winery newest Carmel Wine Walk Tasting Room

The Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea™ is proud to announce Carmel Road Winery as the newest addition to the prestigious group of tasting rooms clustered in the 1 square mile of the downtown Carmel-by-the-Sea.

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With the addition of Carmel Road Winery to the Wine Walk, that brings the tasting room count to a total of 15 on the Wine Walk. The tasting rooms include: Blair Estate, Caraccioli Cellars, Carmel Road Winery, Dawn’s Dream, De Tierra Vineyards, Figge Cellars, Galante Vineyards, Manzoni Cellars, Scheid Vineyards, Shale Canyon, Silvestri Vineyards, Smith Family Wines, Windy Oaks, Wrath Wines  and Vino Napoli.

“We were excited to include Carmel Road Winery to the Wine Walk,” states Scott Caraccioli, VP of Caraccioli Cellars and chair of the Wine Walk group, “the Arroyo Seco appellation is well represented in their wines and the Wine Walk is a great way for them to showcase the best of what Monterey Wine has to offer.”

The Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea™ is a self paced, self guided tour to the tasting rooms which are all within in the Carmel-by-the-Sea business district. Tasters can visit each room to sample local estate-grown wines from the first tasting room (Galante) to the newest (Carmel Road Winery).

The Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea™ also offers the Wine Tasting Passport for $65 which provides tasters with a Wine Walk flight at their choice of any 9 of the 15 tasting rooms. The Wine Walk Passport allows guests the ability to choose and taste the distinct flavors of any nine of the fifteen tasting room all in one day ―or to spread the tastings over a weekend, several weeks, or even months. The Wine Tasting Passport is available for purchase at the Carmel Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center on San Carlos between 5th & 6th in Carmel-by-the-Sea or online at http://www.carmelwinewalk.org.

Each tasting room on the Wine Walk is pleased to offer restaurant recommendations or to call for reservations. As an added bonus, corkage will be waived for bottles purchased at a Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea™ tasting room at participating restaurants for one bottle per visit, per party with official Wine Walk label.

Wine Enthusiasts Infographic on How to Master the Bubble Bar

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Caraccioli Cellars brings home 2 gold medals in the Champagne and Sparkling Wine World Championships

Caraccioli Cellars is proud to announce the award of two gold medals and one silver in the first “Champagne and Sparkling Wine World Championships.” With over 650 entries from 16 different countries and only 7 total medals awarded domestically, (4 gold and 3 silver), the prestigious and selective process recognized Caraccioli Cellars 2006 and 2007 Brut Rosé with gold medals while the Caraccioli Cellars, 2007 Brut Cuvée was awarded a silver medal.

Caraccioli Cellars Brut Rose

Caraccioli Cellars Brut Rose

This is the first wine competition to be judged exclusively by Champagne and sparkling wine specialists and the only global competition in which every judge agrees all the medals awarded. The combination of these two unique attributes ensures an unprecedented level of consistency in the medalling process in the Champagne and Sparkling Wine World Championships.

Of the 650 entries only gold medal wines compete for trophies where the Caraccioli Cellars, 2006 and 2007 Brut Rosé will both be contending for several potential titles. All those wines awarded a Gold medal are retasted side-by-side to select the World Champion Winners including World Champion American Sparkling Wine, and World Champion Vintage Rosé; these results will be announced in September.

“This is a great honor for Caraccioli Cellars because of the strict judging process as well as the quantity and quality of the other entrants in contention for the titles.” states Scott Caraccioli, VP of Marketing, “It is exciting as we are shoulder to shoulder with the greatest and well known sparkling and Champagne producers such as Dom Pérignon and Louis Roederer’s Cristal.”

Quiz: What Type of Wine Drinker are You?

Ever wonder how you stand up to other wine drinkers? In this day and age it’s difficult to know everything about wine (because it’s such an enormous topic), so people choose to focus around the parts they love the most. You could be the best at buying value grocery store wine or be very skilled at understanding what wines cellar the longest. Take the simple 6 question quiz below to find out where you stand!

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Blog post from: http://winefolly.com/update/types-of-wine-drinkers/

Types of Wine Drinkers

  1. Wine is a Grocery

    Wine is part of your life in the same way as toilet paper, coffee or bread. You love it, but mostly for its effects. Some say you’re lazy, but you could care less.

     What to watch out for:

    Yellow stickers. Just because a wine looks like it’s discounted doesn’t mean you’re getting a great tasting wine. A wine like this may have actually declined in flavor (e.g. a 5 yr old Prosecco) or was initially marked up in order to fool you. Yep — This kind of thing happens all the time.

  2. Wine Geek

    You are a wine min-maxer: minimum expense, maximum experience. You seek out hot value regions and learn new things in order to have a great time.

     What to watch out for:

    Bad information. There is a lot of faulty information online and off that can mislead your choices.

  3. Wine Snob

    You spare no expense with your wine habit and your obsession makes you look like a snob. To be fair, you’ve worked very hard to get where you are.

     What to watch out for:

    Ratings and reviews that appeal to your high-brow tastes, not all that glitters is gold… some is just hype.

  4. Wine is Art

    You love how wine bottles look and the colors of wine… maybe even more than the actual wine.

     What to watch out for:

    Beautiful labels and bottles catch your eye; make sure it’s something you want to drink before buying it.

5 Marketing Trends for wineries to Pursue in 2014

1. Social Influencer Marketing
Within any social network, certain figures stand out as more influential than others. They have lots of followers, high engagement rates, and their fans pay attention to what they say. Identifying and connecting with these types of users has become more important than ever. But the growing landscape of social networks and online interactions can make it challenging as well. The need to find and connect with influencers spurred the development of all sorts of websites aimed at helping users solve this problem.
Wine marketing
Sites like Klout and Kred emerged to provide aggregate rankings about user’s influence levels, while others like Quora crowdsource opinions and answers for any topic imaginable. Tools like Buzzstream help us curate and group contact information for PR purposes. Application-specific sites like Circlecount and Tweetreach help us understand the social fabric for particular networks.

At the end of the day, your goal should be to come up with an outreach plan to grow your brand’s social network. To learn more about how to approach this, I recommend checking out this great MOZ article:http://moz.com/blog/identifying-online-community

2. Social Advertising

The world of social advertising really grew up this past year, and has become a valued asset by brands and consumers. Facebook and Twitter rolled out some very effective new platforms for advertising, which have proven to be highly effective. By offering extremely targeted placement – for example, you can publish a sponsored Facebook post and display it to only women, aged 40-45, who are also fans of Wine Spectator and Janice Robinson – brands have the ability to laser in on their exact market. Recent IPOs suggest further improvements will come, as brands large and small adopt these digital platforms into their arsenal. Instagram recently announced a new advertising program, as did Pinterest. Even Snapchat has been getting a lot of press lately for its ability to leverage a connection between brands and consumers.

3. Local Search Marketing

It’s estimated that at least 50% of search queries have some local intent, meaning people routinely use their mobile phone or desktop to find a nearby business. Google continues to modify their search results, and serves up highly targeted local results for these types of queries. Any business that’s trying to bring customers through its doors should focus on how to improve their local search marketing. The first step is to claim a Google+ Places page, which is ground zero for ranking. Google uses these pages to rank businesses, and if you don’t have a Places page that’s completely tuned up with your business details, you probably won’t appear in search results.

Of course, that’s just the start. It’s important to build business listings on major sites like Citysearch, yp.com, and others. Services like Localeze and Yext can help aggregate your business data to major websites for a cost. It’s also important to consider building a presence on relevant regional sites. GetListed has a great resource of the top local citation sources by city, which I highly recommend checking out. For a thorough understanding of how to rank in local search results I would check out this article, which is filled with resources.

Another interesting aspect of local search marketing comes from new technologies that help you geo-target nearby consumers. These tools allow brands to connect with people by offering them a special promotion or message when they’re nearby. For example, when I’m using Waze to get directions somewhere, I might get a message offering me a 2-for-1 special from a Starbucks that I’m passing.

4. Content Marketing Strategy

This past year brought a deluge of bloggers declaring “content is king” – a phrase we’ve heard many times. Yet, the value of content has never been higher. As individuals and brands look for recognition, content is the backbone that helps them rise above. By creating useful and usable content, brands can extend their reach to new heights. On the other hand, the deluge of “thin” content can result in wasted efforts and disappointment. Your brand can no longer remain a static entity online; the content you create and share with others must flow steadily back and forth.

This section really deserves an entire book to fully explore in detail, but I would recommend starting out with Neil Patel’s giant resource – The Advanced Guide to Content Marketing. Or here: Content marketing strategy for wineries from Mike Meisner.

5. Personalization and Segmentation

Big data has been a buzzword for a few years, and it’s been hard for smaller companies to put it into action. In effect, big data is just that – big and hard to wrangle. With some deliberate focus, and help from various tools out there, it doesn’t need to be. The first priority for any brand should be to identify goals. Are you trying to build your subscriber list, get users into your checkout funnel, or understand the best time of day to launch an email marketing plan?

Start by identifying your main priorities, and then you can focus on how to measure that data. Use tools like Google Analytics to understand user behavior on your website. They recently introduced some amazing demographic reports that allow you to measure the age, gender, and interests of your website visitors. Once you understand that males between the ages of 35-45 come to your website on Tuesday morning and have 3x the conversion rate of other shoppers, you can use that information to your advantage. For example, you might then create a targeted Facebook ad campaign that runs on Monday/Tuesday and displays only to users who fit that profile. Email marketing is another area where you can make huge improvements by segmenting your audience to better understand their behavior. Email remains the number one way to connect with your audience, and by tailoring your messaging to specific groups, you’ll extract the most value from your list.

Remarketing is another great way to take advantage of personalization and segmentation. Have you ever been shopping for a pair of shoes online, and then seen those same kicks in a banner ad on the side of an entirely different website? That’s remarketing. It’s actually quite easy to set up a campaign like this using a service like Perfect Audience or Adroll. You can define visitor segments down to the product level, and create matching ads to show those people once they leave your site. It’s simple, smart, and very affordable.

My advice is to pick one or two areas that you’re interested in, and that you feel could really make a difference. Stick with it, and put in some earnest time trying them out. The worst thing you can do is launch a campaign half-cocked, and then decide it was ineffective and a waste of money.

Post By:   Michael Meisner

Commoditization of a Brand

I’ve been thinking about the process by which brands actually become commodities in the first place. Economists sometimes refer to commoditization as a state of “perfect competition”. Of course, from a marketing point of view, that could not be further from the truth. Commodities are uncompetitive as brands. They ride the currents of supply and demand, going up and down in response to market forces with little or no ability to differentiate and no margin beyond that provided through volatility. They have become trades.

Three key forces drive down value-added margin:

1. Commoditization of price – the one we are all familiar with. Products are inevitably drawn down towards the perfect price of free.

Carmel Wine Walk-by-the-Sea, Carmel, CA

Carmel Wine Walk-by-the-Sea, Carmel, CA

2. Commoditization of loyalty– the reasons to stay loyal to one brand come under increasing pressure as others match on features and compete for emotion.

3. Commoditization of delight – consumers now expect more and more as of right, which means that it is increasingly difficult for brands to surprise and delight. At some point, brands that have relied on their innovation to be ahead can get swallowed by the “high tide” of expectation and subsumed.

These forces play out on your brand in what I call “the four stages of one”. These four stages  explain how and why perceived value degrades.

1. The one – you have market dominance – either because you created the category or you now have significant scale in the category. You drive the market, and the market and your competitors look to you for competitive and innovation signals. You have the world’s attention, and that’s both a good and a bad thing. You’re probably feted and criticized in equal measure.

2. Someone – competition intensifies, as others either copy your ‘magic juice’ or create their own. Alternatives appear, sometimes with the same broad formulation, sometimes something completely different. Your market share starts to shrink, but if the market itself is growing, you may or may not even notice or care. You start to lose the ear of consumers. The story that was once yours starts to evolve into a story for the category.

3. Anyone – market demand has grown but your dominance as a brand continues to decline. Seeing the opportunity in this area, your competitors now include not only direct rivals but other firms in related markets who have seen an opportunity to converge into the space. Maybe you wrong-footed a couple of product launches, or your competitors stole a march on a category enhancement. Either way, your tide is going out, and you face increasing pressures from your customers on the price and placement premiums you once commanded as of right.

4. No-one – you’re gone. Either literally or as good as makes no difference. Ironically, the market itself may have grown to the point where, as a whole, it is exponentially more valuable than when you began it, but because of the number of players, the intensity of the competition and the almost inevitable revolutions in distribution that have occurred, the footprint for the sector is now so widely distributed and the value of each percentage of footprint for participants is so small that this is now a very difficult place to make money. You may decide to continue to hold a presence in the sector you founded, but your exit strategy in terms of income dependence should have been well and true activated by now.

Decommoditization reverses this process, but with one important difference. It skips the third stage of one – anyone – and instead looks to shift a brand from ‘no-one’ to at least ‘someone’ in a category. The reason is simple. You need to be ‘someone’ before you can seek to unperch ‘the one’. To do that, you must generate distinctive and competitive meaning for what you offer: meaning that positions you as the rightful challenger and potential market leader. As The Blake Project’s Thomson Dawson put it recently, “To lock onto relevant differentiation means to provide something that is highly valued and not in abundant supply … Innovate greater meanings not more function.”

Where so many companies go wrong is that they do indeed lock themselves into a functions race, trying to redefine the territory they know by adding to what they have and believing that, in doing so, they will head off others around them. It’s a way of thinking that the people at Bizshift perceptively describe as “betterentiation”. Ironically, that process often only adds to the commoditization effect, because it delivers consumers even more at little or no extra cost – raising delivery expectations and lowering margin and surprise opportunities at the same time.

 

Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea™ Hosts Wine Crawl Mixer

Carmel Wine WalkThe Carmel Wine Walk by-the-Sea™ will be hosting their annual Wine Crawl Mixer with the Carmel Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday, March 20th from 5 – 7 PM.

The cost of the event is $10 Carmel Chamber Members, $20 Community Members.

Carmel Wine Walk by-the-SeaThe Wine Crawl will start at the Carmel Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center on San Carlos between 5th and 6th and guests will have the opportunity to sample two tastes at any 5 (of the 10) tasting rooms of their choosing.

The Carmel Wine Walk-by-the-Sea™ is a group of ten vintner and grower tasting rooms in Carmel-by-the-Sea village that have banded together to market and promote walkable, small lot, Monterey County wine tasting in the 1×1 square mile village of Carmel.

Wine Crawlers have the opportunity to choose from two pours at any 5 of the 10 tasting rooms of Caraccioli Cellars, Figge Cellars, Galante Vineyards, Manzoni Cellars, Blaire Estate, Shale Canyon, Scheid Vineyards, Wrath Wines, Vino Napoli and DeTierra Vineyards.

For more information visit http://www.facebook.com/carmlewinewalkbythesea or follow them on twitter @CarmelWineWalk.