Category Archives: Branding

Don’t create a Pinterest contest until reading this

Don’t create a Pinterest contest until reading this.

15 reasons to feel great about being a publicist

15 reasons to feel great about being a publicist

PR is a unique career.

PR executives have made it into the list of the 10 most stressful jobs in America for the past three years. It’s a profession that can break people.

Still, if you are motivated, can check your ego at the door, possess strong attention to detail, and can multitask better than a plate spinner, it can be infinitely rewarding.
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Here’s why it’s cool to be a publicist:

1. We preserve people’s stories in a lasting way. People may lose material objects, but articles live online, in scrapbooks, and on Mom’s Facebook page. We make that happen.

2. We are the rainmakers. We move the economy, getting people to spend by creating excitement about our clients and getting the public to buy stuff. That creates jobs and bolsters commerce.

3. We’re the ever-patient go-betweens. We are the intermediaries who manage the personalities of press and client. We deal with the churlish reporter and the narcissistic celebrity, and neither ever knows the other’s difficult nature; that’s our gratifying little secret.

4. What other job lets you know what’s going to happen in advance, and usually before the press even knows? If you’re an exceedingly curious person, PR is for you. Publicists usually have the scoop on breaking news.

5. The job title has cachet. Clients love to say, “Meet my publicist.” There’s intrinsic value in the sentence.

6. How about those benefits? You might handle the PR for a large law firm, but it comes in handy to know the trade when volunteering your PR expertise for a local homeless shelter, your kids’ school, or your church. You look and feel like a superstar.

7. We have superpowers, but like Superman, we use them responsibly. “Don’t make me wield my social media knife, neighborhood dry cleaner. I’m a publicist.”

8. We can’t turn their brains off, and that’s a good thing. Publicists look at the world in a creative way. We’re identifying trends that have a link to our clients, looking at new communication channels to disseminate information, and identifying different ways to present information that will excite the public. A topsy-turvy Willie Wonka way of perceiving life keeps publicists young.

9. We are good conversationalists. Working in PR, you always have the best “insider” stories of how things sometimes did not quite transpire the way that you’d expected—though often better, and sometimes worse. You’ll be a hit at your cousin’s wedding table recounting your best moments.

10. The side effects. They may include attending gala press openings, meeting childhood heroes, business trips to swank destinations, and a lot of freebie promotional items.

11. We’ll never forget the first time our article or photo ended up in The New York Times.Publicists must be strong writers, and sometimes you hit the jackpot and a media outlet posts your press release verbatim.

12. There is no better feeling than introducing something wonderful to the world. Your clients become your “babies.” You nurture them, introduce them to the public, and watch them grow. Publicists are like parents in that way.

13. We can multitask and problem-solve like nobody’s business. You can figure out what to do in a pinch and always know whom to call (and sometimes you’re on more than one phone at a time). You’re skilled at talking, typing, and texting simultaneously.

14. We aren’t afraid to take risks. Big ideas often mean more press. You have to have an element of fearlessness and a lot of inspiration to “make it work.”

15. No day is ever the same. Repetition is boring. At a PR firm, every day is full of surprises.

By Noreen Heron and Kate Hughes
Noreen Heron is president at Noreen Heron & Associates, Inc., where Kate Hughes works as a senior account executive. Based in Chicago, the full-service agency primarily handles hospitality, entertainment, and restaurant clients. Follow it on Twitter @heronpr. A version of this story first appeared on the agency’s blog.

KELLER WILLIAMS CARMEL REALTY HAS MOVED

JOIN US FOR A SPECIAL CELEBRATION

THURSDAY, JANUARY 23
FROM 5-7PM

26435 Carmel Rancho Blvd.
Carmel, CA 93923

gold20key2-sharp-engineering-inc

CARMEL, CA – Keller Williams Carmel Realty has moved and invites you to

celebrate their new location and their new team leader, Molly McGee.

They will be holding a Carmel Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cutting and

Open House with small bites, wine, and music on Thursday, January 23, 2014

from 5:00 – 7:00pm at 26435 Carmel Rancho Blvd. Carmel, CA 93923.

Please RSVP to 831-622-6200 or Frontdesk505@gmail.comKW Carmel Realty

Quiz: What Type of Wine Drinker are You?

Ever wonder how you stand up to other wine drinkers? In this day and age it’s difficult to know everything about wine (because it’s such an enormous topic), so people choose to focus around the parts they love the most. You could be the best at buying value grocery store wine or be very skilled at understanding what wines cellar the longest. Take the simple 6 question quiz below to find out where you stand!

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Blog post from: http://winefolly.com/update/types-of-wine-drinkers/

Types of Wine Drinkers

  1. Wine is a Grocery

    Wine is part of your life in the same way as toilet paper, coffee or bread. You love it, but mostly for its effects. Some say you’re lazy, but you could care less.

     What to watch out for:

    Yellow stickers. Just because a wine looks like it’s discounted doesn’t mean you’re getting a great tasting wine. A wine like this may have actually declined in flavor (e.g. a 5 yr old Prosecco) or was initially marked up in order to fool you. Yep — This kind of thing happens all the time.

  2. Wine Geek

    You are a wine min-maxer: minimum expense, maximum experience. You seek out hot value regions and learn new things in order to have a great time.

     What to watch out for:

    Bad information. There is a lot of faulty information online and off that can mislead your choices.

  3. Wine Snob

    You spare no expense with your wine habit and your obsession makes you look like a snob. To be fair, you’ve worked very hard to get where you are.

     What to watch out for:

    Ratings and reviews that appeal to your high-brow tastes, not all that glitters is gold… some is just hype.

  4. Wine is Art

    You love how wine bottles look and the colors of wine… maybe even more than the actual wine.

     What to watch out for:

    Beautiful labels and bottles catch your eye; make sure it’s something you want to drink before buying it.

It’s Good to Be the Boss

When it comes to life satisfaction, it’s good to be the boss a new Pew study finds.

Another reason it’s great to be the boss: You’re probably much happier than people who aren’t.

A recent Pew Research Center survey compares the happiness levels of managers versus non-managerial employees and finds bosses are more satisfied with their lives. And it’s not just the cushier paycheck: Bosses also reported greater satisfaction with their work environment and in their personal lives.

For example, 83 percent of bosses reported being “very satisfied” with their family life, compared to 74 percent of non-managers. The contrast is even more stark at the workplace: 69 percent of bosses reported high satisfaction levels with their current job, compared with only 49 percent of non-managers. (Unsurprisingly, bosses were also happier with their financial situation, with 40 percent being very satisfied compared to 28 percent of non-managers.)

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Some other interesting stats: Bosses are more likely to be Republican than employees (53 percent to 37 percent). However, on other traits such as religious attribution and important factors about jobs (fulfilling work and job security for example), bosses and workers are quite similar.

The findings suggest that working your way to the top—or starting your own business, so you’re automatically “the boss”—can offer many payoffs personally and professionally. While the survey wasn’t conducted on entrepreneurs, business owners enjoy many of the same perks as corporate managers: better pay than their employees, more control over their work environment and time and greater flexibility. Other surveys have shown that business owners report higher levels of happiness than the general American workforce.

Another important takeaway from the Pew survey: It suggests that non-managerial employees aren’t nearly as happy with their jobs and personal lives and may inspire bosses to work harder to improve the workplace environment for everyone.  If more than half of your employees are disgruntled or disengaged, you probably want to make some changes.

By: Kelly Spors – Editor

5 Marketing Trends for wineries to Pursue in 2014

1. Social Influencer Marketing
Within any social network, certain figures stand out as more influential than others. They have lots of followers, high engagement rates, and their fans pay attention to what they say. Identifying and connecting with these types of users has become more important than ever. But the growing landscape of social networks and online interactions can make it challenging as well. The need to find and connect with influencers spurred the development of all sorts of websites aimed at helping users solve this problem.
Wine marketing
Sites like Klout and Kred emerged to provide aggregate rankings about user’s influence levels, while others like Quora crowdsource opinions and answers for any topic imaginable. Tools like Buzzstream help us curate and group contact information for PR purposes. Application-specific sites like Circlecount and Tweetreach help us understand the social fabric for particular networks.

At the end of the day, your goal should be to come up with an outreach plan to grow your brand’s social network. To learn more about how to approach this, I recommend checking out this great MOZ article:http://moz.com/blog/identifying-online-community

2. Social Advertising

The world of social advertising really grew up this past year, and has become a valued asset by brands and consumers. Facebook and Twitter rolled out some very effective new platforms for advertising, which have proven to be highly effective. By offering extremely targeted placement – for example, you can publish a sponsored Facebook post and display it to only women, aged 40-45, who are also fans of Wine Spectator and Janice Robinson – brands have the ability to laser in on their exact market. Recent IPOs suggest further improvements will come, as brands large and small adopt these digital platforms into their arsenal. Instagram recently announced a new advertising program, as did Pinterest. Even Snapchat has been getting a lot of press lately for its ability to leverage a connection between brands and consumers.

3. Local Search Marketing

It’s estimated that at least 50% of search queries have some local intent, meaning people routinely use their mobile phone or desktop to find a nearby business. Google continues to modify their search results, and serves up highly targeted local results for these types of queries. Any business that’s trying to bring customers through its doors should focus on how to improve their local search marketing. The first step is to claim a Google+ Places page, which is ground zero for ranking. Google uses these pages to rank businesses, and if you don’t have a Places page that’s completely tuned up with your business details, you probably won’t appear in search results.

Of course, that’s just the start. It’s important to build business listings on major sites like Citysearch, yp.com, and others. Services like Localeze and Yext can help aggregate your business data to major websites for a cost. It’s also important to consider building a presence on relevant regional sites. GetListed has a great resource of the top local citation sources by city, which I highly recommend checking out. For a thorough understanding of how to rank in local search results I would check out this article, which is filled with resources.

Another interesting aspect of local search marketing comes from new technologies that help you geo-target nearby consumers. These tools allow brands to connect with people by offering them a special promotion or message when they’re nearby. For example, when I’m using Waze to get directions somewhere, I might get a message offering me a 2-for-1 special from a Starbucks that I’m passing.

4. Content Marketing Strategy

This past year brought a deluge of bloggers declaring “content is king” – a phrase we’ve heard many times. Yet, the value of content has never been higher. As individuals and brands look for recognition, content is the backbone that helps them rise above. By creating useful and usable content, brands can extend their reach to new heights. On the other hand, the deluge of “thin” content can result in wasted efforts and disappointment. Your brand can no longer remain a static entity online; the content you create and share with others must flow steadily back and forth.

This section really deserves an entire book to fully explore in detail, but I would recommend starting out with Neil Patel’s giant resource – The Advanced Guide to Content Marketing. Or here: Content marketing strategy for wineries from Mike Meisner.

5. Personalization and Segmentation

Big data has been a buzzword for a few years, and it’s been hard for smaller companies to put it into action. In effect, big data is just that – big and hard to wrangle. With some deliberate focus, and help from various tools out there, it doesn’t need to be. The first priority for any brand should be to identify goals. Are you trying to build your subscriber list, get users into your checkout funnel, or understand the best time of day to launch an email marketing plan?

Start by identifying your main priorities, and then you can focus on how to measure that data. Use tools like Google Analytics to understand user behavior on your website. They recently introduced some amazing demographic reports that allow you to measure the age, gender, and interests of your website visitors. Once you understand that males between the ages of 35-45 come to your website on Tuesday morning and have 3x the conversion rate of other shoppers, you can use that information to your advantage. For example, you might then create a targeted Facebook ad campaign that runs on Monday/Tuesday and displays only to users who fit that profile. Email marketing is another area where you can make huge improvements by segmenting your audience to better understand their behavior. Email remains the number one way to connect with your audience, and by tailoring your messaging to specific groups, you’ll extract the most value from your list.

Remarketing is another great way to take advantage of personalization and segmentation. Have you ever been shopping for a pair of shoes online, and then seen those same kicks in a banner ad on the side of an entirely different website? That’s remarketing. It’s actually quite easy to set up a campaign like this using a service like Perfect Audience or Adroll. You can define visitor segments down to the product level, and create matching ads to show those people once they leave your site. It’s simple, smart, and very affordable.

My advice is to pick one or two areas that you’re interested in, and that you feel could really make a difference. Stick with it, and put in some earnest time trying them out. The worst thing you can do is launch a campaign half-cocked, and then decide it was ineffective and a waste of money.

Post By:   Michael Meisner

Why not study love, happiness, joy, bravery and courage?

Instead of being attentive to what is right, some people tend to overemphasize what is wrong: why relationships do not work out, why diets fail, why personal finances are out of order, why bad luck always seems to arrive.

Embedded in that negative tone, whether it be in outward communication or self-talk, is a pervasive insidiousness that, if unbridled, has the potential to cause emotional, mental and physical harm.

Psychologists have been saying it for years: Positive self-talk has important and tangible benefits, for our health, wellness and our relationships.

However, in the realm of communication – communication competencies, group communication, interpersonal dialogue, messaging, mass media and other forms of interaction – discussions around positive interpersonal communication have been largely absent.

But a shift is occurring.

University of Arizona researcher Margaret Pitts and Thomas J. Socha of Old Dominion University have organized and co-edited the first collections of scholarly works devoted to positive interpersonal communication in their discipline.

“We want to ensure that the field of communication participates equally in the health, wellness and quality-of-life conversations,” said Pitts, an assistant professor in the UA communication department.

“Communication has a lot to offer to the positive movement because the field allows us to go beyond what is in our head to study the messages and behaviors we engage in with other people. Through communication, we enact psychology,” Pitts said, adding that more readily connecting psychology and communication can result in improvements in health, wellness and relationships.

“Merging communication with psychology is the next step. We can create the bridge because we have to communicate,” Pitts said. “That’s the point – let’s see things in action.”

In that direction, “The Positive Side of Interpersonal Communication” was released in 2012 while “Positive Communication in Health and Wellness” was released just this year, both by Peter Lang International Academic Publishers in the U.S., Germany, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

In the volumes, scholars address ways to synchronize positive communication among individuals of different cultural backgrounds, the use of humor in health-care settings, positivity in end-of-life conversations, the role of balancing positive and challenging communication in mother-daughter relationships for cancer patients, the need for fun and play in romantic partnerships, and the importance of intimacy in communication among older adults, among other topics.

Collectively, the volumes make a powerful assertion that “positive communication is not defined as the absence of negative verbal and nonverbal communication, but rather the presence of positive, enhancing and facilitative talk and gestures,” as Pitts and Socha wrote in the 2013 volume.

“It should be understood that positive communication is also not about naïvely attending to only good things (i.e., being overly optimistic or avoiding negativity), but rather it is about applying and studying communication that allows us to thrive in the full spectrum of life experiences,” Pitts and Socha also noted.

It’s about positive psychology and communication.

Martin Seligman, while president of the American Psychological Association in 1998, first described “positive psychology” in an attempt to usher in a new era of pathology research and maintenance.

Seligman contended that the field of psychology had focused too heavily on negative happenings, arguing that positive psychology would enable more attention to be paid on positive emotions and character traits, and even institutions and organizations.

“He decided to start a movement,” said Socha, a communication professor at Old Dominion in Virginia. “Until then, psychology was focused on normality and deficits, so it was following a medical model so that when a patient left the psychologists’ offices, what they could do was limited.”

That dynamic happens often. Socha said to consider your prior interactions with therapists, mechanics, physicians and the like.

“In the way that medicine works, it’s the same with cars. Notice that mechanisc don’t immediately talk about how they can strengthen your car. We don’t think that way,” Socha said.

“In communication, we don’t always focus on good outcomes of messages. In a similar kind of way, we fall into the trap of looking at problems, deficits and dark points,” Socha said, noting the discipline’s emphasis on deception, unwanted communication, anger, stalking and other negative tendencies.

Focusing on happiness and flourishing and not merely a person’s challenging psychological state yielded better benefits, Socha and Pitts emphasized.

Both also affirmed that people need to focus on more positive aspects in their lives, finding better balance between the good and bad, ultimately resulting in more responsive, authentic and healthy individuals.

“Within the context of health and wellness we recognize that health extends well beyond encounters with health-care professionals,” Socha said.

“It flows throughout our major life domains – relationships, work places, places of leisure and learning,” Socha said, noting the vast promise positive psychology and communication hold.

“It’s a very attractive idea,” he said. “Why not study love, happiness, joy, bravery and courage?”

In fact, that is what is happening globally.

In 2008 Gallup and Healthways began partnering on a long-standing investigation, tracking happiness and enjoyment among the world’s citizens.

Also, Bhutan has begun measuring national happiness, referenced as “gross national happiness,” as an indication of wealth much in the same way a country’s gross domestic product is calculated. Other countries, including the U.S., are considering the same.

“What can I say to inspire someone to be better? If we can get a fuller, better picture of what makes us feel good, positive and confident, we can provide feedback to encourage productive behaviors,” Pitts said.

“We can manipulate our environment in very small ways to enhance an experience or our communication,” she also said. “This goes back to the quality of life issue.”

By La Monica Everett-Haynes, University Communications | February 28, 2013